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Consumer Agency to Investigate iPhone's Cold Weather Problem

Finland’s Consumer Agency says that customers who bought an iPhone and were not informed about how it performs in cold weather may be entitled to return the product and ask for a refund.

Nainen puhuu iPhoneen.
Image: YLE

The iPhone’s 'normal operating temperatures' are between 0 and 35 degrees Celsius, and the average temperature in Helsinki is below zero for four months of the year. Although the phone can be stored in temperatures as low as -20, Apple advises users not to operate the device in freezing conditions. If they do, Apple says they run the risk of shortening battery life or causing the phone to stop working temporarily.

The Consumer Agency has received a lot of questions about the iPhone’s performance in cold weather.

According to the ombudsman, customers dissatisfied with their phone’s functionality in cold weather can return it to the merchant and ask for a refund - if they were not informed about the normal operating temperatures before they purchased the phone.

The Consumer Agency is now compiling a list of questions for iPhone maker Apple in order to establish how the iPhone functions in cold weather and how best to communicate this information to customers. They would particularly like to know if salespeople have been instructed to explain iPhone’s cold-weather performance to potential customers.

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