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Criminals may lose social benefits

A new government proposal contemplates stripping criminals of their social benefits.

Robin Lardot
Robin Lardot, Deputy National Police Commissioner. Image: Yle

Those involved in organised crime may lose their entitlement to housing and unemployment benefits, among other allowances.

It is still not clear how officials would implement the new system, which would require the exchange of information between different authorities.

The matter is being investigated by a government-appointed working group, which should come up with a proposal by the end of the year.

According to Robin Lardot, Deputy National Police Commissioner of the National Police Board, different authorities in addition to the police need to work together to combat organised crime.

“From the point of view of the police, it is rather strange that some people enjoy different benefits like the unemployment benefit, though their main occupation is crime,” Lardot comments.

The Police Commissioner did not know whether child benefits would be among the removed allowances.

“This we do not know yet, as the work has not started. The main issue here is what kind of signal society wants to send to such criminals. Should we continue in this manner, where one authority tries to stamp out criminal activities while another one helps the perpetrators to continue? What is at stake here is stopping crime,” Lardot says.

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