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Ex-PM Aho quits Nokia for Harvard

Esko Aho is leaving Nokia's leadership team for a position at Harvard University.

Esko Aho
Esko Aho Image: Yle

Aho, who served as the company's executive vice president for Corporate Relations and Responsibility, has been appointed as a Senior Fellow at Harvard's Kennedy School. There the former prime minister is to pursue research on the role of the state in maintaining welfare and global competitiveness.

Aho will to continue as a consultative partner with Nokia.

The former Centre Party chair led the Finnish government during the recession years of 1991-95, becoming the country's youngest prime minister at age 36. After narrowly losing the 2000 presidential election to Tarja Halonen, he spent a year at Harvard as a resident fellow at the Institute of Politics.

He then spent four years as president of the state innovation fund, Sitra.

Last month the embattled handset maker announced another member of the Nokia Leadership Team was leaving. Colin Giles, executive vice president of sales, will step down at the end of June. No replacement has been named.

 

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