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Microsoft takes over Nokia HQ

Nokia has vacated its long-time headquarters in Keilaniemi Espoo, following the sale of its mobile phone business to its smartphone platform partner Microsoft. The PC and software giant will now be taking up residence in the former Nokia premises.

Nokian pääkonttori Espoossa.
Leading PC and software company Microsoft is set to take over former Nokia headquarters following confirmation of its purchase of the company's mobile phone business. Image: Sari Gustafsson / Lehtikuva

PC and software giant Microsoft is set to take over the former Espoo headquarters of mobile technology company Nokia, following its purchase of the Finnish company’s struggling mobile phone business.

The space is currently owned by the property investment and management company Exilion, since Nokia surrendered ownership in a sale-and-lease-back arrangement commonly used in corporate circles. At the time Nokia pocketed 170 million euros in the transaction.

Some of Nokia’s remaining employees – including management and research teams -- will relocate to Nokia’s own premises in Karaportti, Espoo, while others will set up in Otaniemi.

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