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Juha Sipilä.

Wednesday's papers: New cabinet predictions, daycare savings drive and new mosque for Helsinki?

Predictions for who'll get which job in Finland's next cabinet abound this morning, ahead of this afternoon's announcement by Juha Sipilä of the shape of the new government. Elsewhere, there are revelations of council plans to cut daycare costs by diverting youngsters into part-time childcare clubs, and could a long-standing scheme to build a grand mosque in the capital finally be coming to fruition?

Daily newspapers.

Tuesday's papers: Ministry of Environment to stay, EU wants Finland to take 688 Mediterranean refugees, 'maternal instinct' saves 16-month-old from meningitis

In Tuesday’s papers there were a lot of reactions about the ongoing new government formation talks. The front page of Helsingin Sanomat announced that the Ministry of the Environment will remain as it is, and will not – as previously discussed – become part of the Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry. Hufvudstadsbladet writes that Finland may soon be increasing the number of its refugee quota due to the refugee deluge from the Mediterranean. According to Iltalehti, the mother of a 16-month-old girl knew that there was something more serious with her daughter than a mere fever – it turns out she was right; maternal instincts likely saved her daughter's life from meningitis.

Lapsia uima-altaan reunalla uimakoulussa.

Cuts threaten children’s swimming instruction

In 2004 the Finnish National Board of Education approved a new core curriculum stating that swimming instruction should be a part of comprehensive school physical education. Specifically, children should learn to handle emergencies near water and swim continuously for 200 metres by the age of 11. Fulfilment of this schooling requirement varies greatly in Finland at present, and swimming instructors are concerned about what the incoming government’s municipal spending cuts will mean for the future of the programme.

Laituri kesämökin rannassa.

Only 6 percent of summer cottage owners are under 40

The humble Finnish summer cabin, or 'mökki', is a beloved feature of the Finnish countryside and the country boasts over half a million of them, one for every five residents. A generational change is soon in store, however, as over 80 percent of the holiday homes are now owned by someone over 50 years of age. Legal experts are urging Finland’s older generation to sell or gift their property soon, before the infrequently-used cottages become worn down and lose their value.

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