News

Previous stories

Merja Kyllönen.

Monday's papers: Sexism in Finnish politics, services held for murdered aid workers, and pain relief by phone

Jibes about weight, online abuse, and growing pressure over appearance - these are the things some female politicians say they are subjected to while their male colleagues are free to get on with their job. The debate over differential treatment in Finnish politics was reignited over the weekend with a prominent MP speaking out about the treatment she's received, and in today's papers many other women parliamentarians come forward to describe similar experiences. Elsewhere, the organisation whose two Finnish aid workers were murdered in Afghanistan last week says it's suspending its local mental health projects, and Helsinki health authority begins offering pain-relief advice to cancer sufferers by phone.

Luodinreikä suomalaisia avustustyöntekijöitä kuljettaneen taksin ikkunassa Heratissa 24. heinäkuuta.

Tuomioja: No-one yet come forward over aid worker killings

More details are emerging about the two aid workers who were gunned down in western Afghanistan on Thursday while working for the International Assistance Mission. Both had long experience in the country and were well integrated into the local area, the IAM said. Meanwhile Finland's Foreign Minsiter told Yle on Friday that they have not received any more information about the murders than what has publicly come out of Afghanistan.

Warkauden Lehti ja Iisalmen Sanomat.

Thursday's papers: What will Russia do next? Child safety checks ignored, and the Finnish economy's "lost year"

The poignant scenes of the return to Holland of the bodies of the victims of flight MH-17 dominate Finland's press this morning. Alongside the reports on the latest diplomatic moves to try and secure Russian co-operation over the Ukraine crisis, some papers take a moment to revisit Finland's recent run-ins with its eastern neighbour, and explore the worst-case scenario should Russia's economy crash. Elsewhere, papers reveal a widespread lack of background checks on those working with children, and an overview of Finland's economic outlook makes bleak reading.

Latest

Muualla Yle.fi:ssä