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Siilasmaa: Nokia will draw strength from Finnishness

Risto Siilasmaa, who is to assume the post of Nokia chairman on Thursday afternoon, says he supports the company’s current strategy and sees no need for further changes.

Risto Siilasmaa A-Plus -ohjelman vieraana vuonna 2008.
Risto Siilasmaa A-Plus -ohjelman vieraana vuonna 2008. Image: YLE

Siilasmaa says he is convinced that Nokia has the right team, the correct strategy and increasingly better products, which will steer the company into recovery.

He professes pride at becoming Nokia’s next chairman and says he plans to uphold the company’s chosen strategy.

“My goal is to support the company’s leadership. Nokia’s company culture will be drawn from Finnishness in the future, as well,” Siilasmaa says.  

He notes also that, since the arrival of CEO Stephen Elop in autumn 2010, the company culture has changed in significant ways.   

According to Siilasmaa, he sees no need for further changes in the company as it is already in the middle of a transition process.

“In spite of all challenges, the company has a real fighting spirit. The employees are proud of the company and of its new products,” he says.

Siilasmaa spoke to journalists at a press conference prior to Nokia’s annual general meeting, which started at 2pm at Helsinki’s Exhibition and Convention Centre. Some 3300 people were taking part, representing about 40 percent of shareholders.

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