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Finns mostly trust weather forecasts and THL research, survey finds

Meanwhile, fewer than 10 percent of respondents admitted they trust information found in horoscopes.

The country's weather forecasters received a great deal of trust among respondents, with more than four-out-of-five saying they trusted local weather forecasts completely or to some extent. Image: Jussi Nukari / Lehtikuva

More than three quarters of Finns trust public data, like information from Statistics Finland, according to a recent survey by the non-profit NGO Foundation for Municipal Development.

Nearly as many respondents said they also trusted the country's official research bodies, such as the Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare (THL).

Confidence levels tended to increase in tandem with respondents' education levels, according to the survey.

When the respondents were divided politically, supporters of the Social Democratic Party, the National Coalition Party and the Green League tended to trust the data and information from public entities, while Finns Party voters tended to be most critical of such research findings, the survey found.

The country's weather forecasters received a great deal of trust among respondents, with more than four-out-of-five saying they trusted local weather forecasts completely or to some extent.

Meanwhile, a majority of respondents said they trusted economic forecasts and business barometers (around 65 percent) and party support surveys (60 percent).

Trust in this sort of data tended to increase with a respondent's age, although a greater proportion of university graduates, business executives and entrepreneurs also trusted it, according to the foundation.

The survey found the lowest levels of trust and confidence in horoscopes (8 percent) and megatrends (49 percent) which are used to predict future changes to society.

Horoscopes saw the most trust (18 percent) from people under the age of 30 and members of SAK, the Central Organisation of Finnish Trade Unions (16 percent).

The foundation's survey was carried out in November and December 2020 and queried more than 1,000 residents in Finland aged 18-79. The margin of error was fewer than three percentage points in either direction.