Yle offers articles from public service media across Europe

European public service media companies are part of a co-ordinated effort to exchange text-based content and thereby increase understanding between Europeans. 

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Do you want to know what Portuguese people think about Covid vaccines? Or how Covid has persuaded French women to ditch their bras?

That's the goal of the Window on Europe service that Yle is a part of. Ten members of the European Broadcasting Union (EBU) including Yle have joined together to share online content with each other.

This project mirrors the video exchange that has operated for decades among EBU members, with text-based stories now shared between Belgium's RTBF, France Televisions, Germany's BR-ARD, Ireland's RTE, RAI from Italy, Portugal's RTP, Spain's RTVE, the Swiss SWI and the French-German company ARTE.

"The goal is to improve Europeans' understanding of each other in these polarised times and help people see how other Europeans live," said Yle News Lab's Jukka Niva who is responsible for the project at Yle.

Niva adds that as fake news spreads quickly in many European countries, companies that are part of EBU have a significant role in distributing trustworthy and verified information.

The Window on Europe could, therefore, help combat fake news.

"Public Service Media companies make news and background stories that are edited and checked and that comply with strict editorial processes," said Niva.

The stories are in English for now, although in the long run the hope is that machine translation might be able to produce Finnish versions.

"EBU is using the world's best translation programmes, but because these artificial intelligence-based translation programmes can be unreliable in Finnish, we are starting in English," said Niva.

Niva says that the programmes' development is constantly followed by Yle's Eurovision unit, and if the quality of Finnish texts improves, they will then be published in Finnish too.

Other EBU companies are, in turn, publishing Yle stories on their own sites. These stories come from Yle's English-language unit, Yle News.

Parts of the article content might not be accessible, for example, with a screen reader.