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Ministry of Justice: No new extradition requests from Turkey

Turkey has called on Finland and Sweden to extradite about 33 terrorism suspects.

According to the Ministry of Justice, Finland, Sweden and Turkey signing the trilateral memorandum on Tuesday does not change how extradition requests are handled in Finland. Image: Heikki Saukkomaa / Lehtikuva

Finland has not received any new extradition requests from Turkey over the past few days, according to the Ministry of Justice.

Turkey repeated its demand earlier this week for Finland and Sweden to extradite suspected terrorists. Turkish Justice Minister Bekir Bozdag told the Russian network NTV on Wednesday that the country would seek the extradition of 12 people from Finland and 21 from Sweden.

This comes after Finland, Sweden and Turkey signed a trilateral memorandum in Madrid on Tuesday, on the sidelines of the Nato summit with Turkey agreeing to back Finland and Sweden's applications to join the military alliance.

Turkey's president Recep Tayyip Erdoğan told reporters at the Nato summit on Thursday that Sweden had agreed to extradite 73 "terrorists" to Turkey, but this has not yet been verified by Swedish authorities.

"In Sweden, independent judicial institutions apply the law. Swedish citizens will not be extradited," Sweden's Minister of Justice and Home Affairs, Morgan Johansson, told Swedish radio.

Earlier in June, Turkey demanded that Finland extradite people suspected of terrorist offences.

Ministry of Justice: No change in how extraditions are handled

According to the Ministry of Justice, the signing the memorandum on Tuesday by Finland, Sweden and Turkey will not change how extradition requests are handled in Finland.

Justice Minister Anna-Maija Henrikson (SPP) said on Wednesday that Finland will continue to follow the same international agreements regarding extraditions as previously.

Over the last decade, Turkey has requested that Finland extradite about 16 people. Of those, only two extradition requests have been carried out, according to Finnish authorities.

The ministry told Yle that reasons for the refusal have included Finnish citizenship and lack of dual criminality. Dual criminality means that the criminal act is punishable in both countries.

The ministry added that two extradition cases are currently pending, but no further details were currently available.