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No changes to Finnish legislation from deal with Turkey, Foreign Minister Haavisto says

Turkish president Recep Tayyip Erdoğan has called on Finland and Sweden to "fulfill the promises" made to Turkey.

In order to avoid promising anything on behalf of their legislatures or parliaments, Finland and Sweden needed to exercise caution during Tuesday's talks, Haavisto told Yle. Image: Silja Viitala / Yle

Foreign Minister Pekka Haavisto (Green) told Yle on Friday morning that no changes to Finnish legislation were agreed upon in any shape or form in the signing of a trilateral memorandum between Turkey, Finland, and Sweden in Madrid on Tuesday.

The signing of the memorandum saw Turkey pledge to support the Nordic countries' Nato applications, but Turkish president Recep Tayyip Erdoğan said on Thursday that his country could not ratify Finland and Sweden's application to join the military alliance unless the countries upheld their promises.

Erdoğan demanded changes to the terrorism legislation of both Nordic nations, as well as the extradition to Turkey of about 33 terrorism suspects, and referred to the trilateral agreement that was signed between the three countries, as well as the talks that took place during the negotiations.

However, while accepting that different views could be expressed, Haavisto emphasised that only the text of the document had been agreed upon.

"Everything that was agreed upon was put on paper," Haavisto told Yle.

He further noted that Finland and Sweden had needed to exercise caution during Tuesday's talks, in order to avoid promising anything on behalf of their legislatures or parliaments.

On Monday, Finland and Sweden will begin their Nato accession talks, after which Nato member states, including Turkey, should sign the two Nordic countries' accession protocol.

Ratification will take place in due course, so there is still a "long way to go", Haavisto added.