Sign up for our newsletter ⟩
News |

Finland to enjoy exceptionally warm Midsummer holiday

The highest temperatures may be recorded in the southern and western parts of the country at around 26–28 degrees.

Kokko palaa juhannusaattona Keski-Suomessa.
With widespread forest fire warning in place, it remains to be seen whether traditional midsummer bonfires can be lit this year. Image: Lukijan kuva

Finland is in for a rare midsummer treat with the weather forecast predicting a warmer than average — if not hot — holiday weekend.

“This midsummer, it looks like the temperature will rise to heatwave readings at least in southern and western Finland — perhaps even going above 25 degrees celsius, “ Yle meteorologist Matti Huutonen predicted.

Even in Lapland, the southern parts will experience temperatures of over 20 degrees, while northern Lapland will hover between 10 and 15 degrees.

The meteorologist is forecasting an overall sunny Midsummer’s day with the exception of brief local afternoon showers in southern Finland.

The highest temperatures may be recorded in the southern and western parts of the country at around 26–28 degrees.

According to Huutonen's forecast, Sunday, 21 June looks the warmest of the midsummer weekend days with the weather map predicting “helle” (above 25 degrees celsius) readings from south to north.

Midsummer weather like this is quite rare, according to the Finnish Meteorological Institute. Statistics reveal that the last time Helsinki experienced such an extremely warm midsummer was in 1999. Last year, the midsummer high temperature at 24.5 degree approached but didn’t quite reach the helle limit.

Record high temperatures

It is going to be a hot week in much of the country. This summer's heat record was broken on Sunday when Ylitornio in Finnish Lapland hit 28.8 degrees

Forecasts predict that this record may be broken on Tuesday with the possibility of southern and western Finland hitting a high of 30 degrees.

As the week progresses however, the weather may become a little more unstable, with humid air travelling from the Baltic, bringing the high probability of rain and thunderstorms in southern and central Finland.

Currently, since there is a widespread forest fire warning in place across the country it remains to be seen whether traditional midsummer bonfires can be lit this year.

“The situation must be monitored until Midsummer's Eve when the latest warning map is released,” Huutonen said.

Waters warmer than average

The steady stream of warm days has heated up the water surface temperatures across the country.

In southern and central Finland, you can swim in 20C water already. The water temperatures are up to six degrees warmer than average.

Latest in: News

Headlines

Our picks

Latest

Muualla Yle.fi:ssä