News |

National Bureau of Investigation opens doors to public

Finland’s Keskusrikospoliisi (National Bureau of Investigation) held its first-ever open house on Saturday, attracting over 10,000 visitors to its headquarters in Vantaa. The tour allowed the public to view art forgeries, rollover simulators and artefacts from famous murder and kidnapping cases in Finnish history.

Video: Poliisiautosimulaattori.
01:18
Video: Yle

The National Bureau of Investigation (NBI), headquartered in the city of Vantaa since 1994, is a nationwide division of the Police of Finland. It is charged with fighting international, organised, professional, financial and other serious crime. The NBI investigates offences, provides expert services and develops methods for crime fighting and criminal investigation, as well as responding to offenses connected to Finland’s money laundering and asset freezing statutes.

The NBI opened its doors to the public for the first time in its history on Saturday, and public interest was overwhelming, with over 10,000 people lining up for long periods to have a peek inside.

Among other things, the headquarter’s Crime Museum gave visitors a glimpse of some 6,000 pieces of criminal history, including tools used in crimes, objects related to punishment, documents and photos. The museum had never been opened to the public before.

An orchestra kept the line of attendees entertained while they waited to be admitted. The most famous attraction on the grounds outside was a police car simulator that allowed passengers to feel what it would be like to roll over in a police car.

Timo Kilpi took a ride in the rollover simulator and said it was shocking:

“I really wouldn’t want to go through it in real life. Even slowed down like that, it felt pretty bad.”

The NBI also has field offices in Tampere, Turku, Mariehamn, Joensuu, Oulu and Rovaniemi.

Some sixty percent of the Bureau's personnel serve as police officers in investigative and intelligence duties, while the rest of the staff is comprised of chemists, laboratory assistants, clerks, engineers and linguistic experts.

Latest in: News

Headlines

Our picks

Latest

Muualla Yle.fi:ssä