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Watch wild birds on WWF’s winter feeding site livecam

A camera placed in a South Karelia forest offers a ringside seat for viewing endangered birds.

Pähkinänakkeli WWF:n Luontoliven uusimmassa lähetyksessä, jossa katsoja pääsee seuraamaan lintujen talviruokintaa vanhassa, suojellussa metsässä.
The livestream offers a look at winter birdlife in Finland. Image: Hannu Siitonen / WWF Luontolive

The Finnish chapter of conservation NGO WWF launched the winter season of its wild bird livestream on Thursday, offering a comfortable vantage point for viewing birds feasting at a winter feeding site.

The livestream went was published on Thursday and can be viewed at WWF Finland’s Nature Live (Luontolive) site.

The organisation has set up the camera for the second time in old protected forests in Southern Karelia, allowing armchair ornithologists to observe avians such as great tits and jays as well as endangered tufted and willow tits and even white-backed woodpeckers.

"The greatest threats to the endangered tufted and willow tit are logging and lack of biodiversity. For example commercial forests do not provide nearly as much winter food for willow tits as old natural forests," WWF programme manager Petteri Tolvanen said in a statement.

According to Hannu Siitonen, whose forests are protected by the Agriculture and Forestry Ministry’s Metso programme to promote forest biodiversity, the camera displays a buzz of activity.

"Most people don’t even know what an old forest is like. This camera shows the diversity of a forest and the species [that can be found] in an old forest, like the willow tit," he said in the statement.

The livecam for feathered forest dwellers has audio, unlike some other nature streams.

WWF Finland said that its live cams have been viewed at least 12 million times during the past three years. Other live cams can still be viewed and feature wildlife such as osprey, Saimaa ringed seals and adders.

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